Catalino Rubio - Warmth Filter

$20.00

ORIGIN: DEPT OF FRANCISCO MORAZAN, OJOJONA, HONDURAS
VARIETY:CATUAI, PARAINEMA, LEMPIRA
PROCESS: WASHED     
NOTES: CHOCOLATE, MALT, RED APPLE

This coffee is brought to us by Catalino Rubio, who bought his first farm in 2012. He bought this land with a completely different business venture in mind, and after talks with other community coffee producers, they encouraged him to take advantage of the uncultivated area on his property and plant coffee. Producing coffee over the last many years has been an uphill climb. When it was time to harvest his very first crop in 2014, the only place he could take the processed coffee was 120km away from his property and the prices were very low. However, over the last couple of years the coffee industry has changed and he is able to sell his crop as a differentiated product allowing Catalino to get better and more fair prices for the coffee he grows. In addition to growing coffee, he also grows bananas and other basic grains on his property. Catalino has plans to improve the conditions on his farm and plant more coffee in order to continue to improve income on the farm.

This coffee is pulped the same day it is harvested, then left in a concrete pile for a 20 to 28 hour dry fermentation. Then the coffee is washed in the same pile, changing the water up to 3 times and then it is passed through the scavenging channel to classify and remove the light grains. The washed coffee is transferred to a concrete patio where it is pre-dried for 3 days, then it is transferred to African beds to complete a drying period of 20 to 25 days.

This coffee is a blend of three different varieties: Catuai, Parainema and Lempira. Both Parainema and Lempira varieties were developed and distributed in Honduras because of their disease resistant qualities. Both varieties are high yielding and have robusta lineage. It is very common for these types of varieties to be grown in Honduras, in fact approximately 70% of their crops are disease resistant varieties. This is becoming more common in many Central American countries as a way to continue to grow coffee sustainably.